Web Design Terms

 

  • Above-the-fold. What is visible on a website without scrolling down
  • Analytics. Software presenting data about how the website is used.
  • Backend – The software running to manage the content.
  • Browser testing. The website should work on any device with any browser.
  • CTA. A Call To Action to the person visiting. Encourages interaction.
  • Content Development. Creating a story, usually in text, images and through videos.
  • CMS. Content Management System. Enables changes to a website for people without coding skills.
  • CR. Conversion Rate. How many of the visitors actually take any of the action intended by the creator of the web site.
  • CSS. Cascading Style Sheet.
  • CP. Customer Personas. The ideal person you have in mind when creating the website.
  • DN. Domain Name. The name of the website as it is displayed in any weblink. Replaces the number used by the Internet Protocol (implemented by the software and hardware communicating the data between devices), to be more memorable and readable.
  • Flat Design. No 3D at all in the visual appearance
  • Front End. What you see when you visit
  • Grid System. To help have an overview
  • FTP. File Transfer Protocol. Used to establish and maintain a connection that transfers the website files to the server hosting it.
  • HTML. HyperText Markup Language. Markups are labels contained within < and > that tell the browser how to present the text outside those labels.
  • Infinite Scrolling. Presents all website content in a certain category on one single page.
  • Information Architecture. The art of organizing the content to be easy to find and to lead the visitor on the path towards the intended goals.
  • Lead Form. Forms that people fill in to connect with the website’s creator
  • Localization. Adapting the website depending on the targeted audiences local culture and identity.
  • Meta Tags. Information useful to the software interpreting the website pages.
  • Mobile First. Designing with the mobile devices primarily in mind
  • Mockup. A picture of how the website will look, before it is actually implemented.
  • Parallax Scrolling. Creating an illusion of depth by moving foreground and background images at different speed as the user scrolls a web page.
  • Raster Graphics Editor. The typical software used by designers to create and manipulate images. Commonly used examples are GIMP (runs on Windows, Mac and Linux) and Adobe Photoshop (Windows, Mac).
  • Responsive Design. Makes the website adapt to the properties of the device it is viewed on.
  • QA. Quality Assurance. Making sure that everything works as intended. A test plan can help when the functionality is complex.
  • SEO. Search Engine Optimization.
  • Sitemap. How the website is organized
  • SVG. Scalable Vector Graphics. Allows high resolution graphics without loading graphics files.
  • Template. Tells the CMS how to render web pages.
  • UI Design. User Interface. Deciding how the user can interacts.
  • UX Design. User EXperience. Deciding how the user will feel about the web site, and what goals it will be able to realize.
  • Whitespace. Space without content
  • Wireframe. Designs that have less detail than a Mockup.